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Seasonal variations in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in a Swedish cohort

Overview of attention for article published in Endocrine, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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55 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
Title
Seasonal variations in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in a Swedish cohort
Published in
Endocrine, February 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12020-015-0548-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva Klingberg, Göran Oleröd, Jan Konar, Max Petzold, Ola Hammarsten

Abstract

To study seasonal inter-individual and intra-individual variations in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and to explore parameters associated with 25(OH)D in a healthy Swedish adult population. 540 blood donors (60 % men; mean age 41 ± 13 years) and 75 thrombocyte donors (92 % men, aged 46 ± 11 years) were included. Serum was collected during 12 months and analyzed for 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (S-iPTH). The blood donors answered questionnaires concerning vitamin D supplements, smoking, physical activity, sunbed use and sun holidays. Repeated serum samples were collected from the thrombocyte donors to study the intra-individual variations in S-25(OH)D. S-25(OH)D varied greatly over the year correlating with the intensity of the UV-B irradiation (r S = 0.326; p < 0.001). During January-March, a S-25(OH)D level below the thresholds of 50 and 75 nmol/L was observed in 58 and 88 %, respectively, and during July-September in 11 and 50 % (p < 0.001). S-25(OH)D was negatively correlated with body mass index and S-iPTH, but was significantly higher in holiday makers in sunny destinations, sunbed users, non-smokers, and in the physically active. The intra-individual analyses showed a mean increase in S-25(OH)D by 8 nmol/L/month between April and August. Approximately 75 % had serum 25(OH)D values <75 nmol/L during 75 % of the year and 50 % had serum 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L during 50 % of the year. Serum 25(OH)D was strongly associated with parameters related to sun exposure, but only weakly with intake of vitamin D supplements.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 70 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Student > Master 15 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Other 7 9%
Researcher 7 9%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Sports and Recreations 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2015.
All research outputs
#3,068,080
of 6,775,357 outputs
Outputs from Endocrine
#190
of 602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,227
of 207,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Endocrine
#9
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,775,357 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 602 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.