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Gluten-free-rendered products contribute to imbalanced diets in children and adolescents with celiac disease

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, April 2018
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Title
Gluten-free-rendered products contribute to imbalanced diets in children and adolescents with celiac disease
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, April 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00394-018-1685-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Larretxi, E. Simon, L. Benjumea, J. Miranda, M. A. Bustamante, A. Lasa, F. J. Eizaguirre, I. Churruca

Abstract

As well as adhering to the safe limit for gluten intake, a suitable gluten-free (GF) diet must also be nutritionally balanced. However, malnutrition has been observed in the population with celiac disease (CD). This is even more important in the case of children and adolescents, whose GF diet must also ensure their proper growth. The aim of the present study was to assess the diet quality of children and adolescents with CD to attain optimal nutritional status, determining the most relevant factors that affect a balanced diet. Eighty-three children and adolescents with CD (9.2 ± 3.8 years) took part in the study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Adherence to Mediterranean diet by KIDMED index was analyzed, and energy and nutrients intake. The diet of participants was not balanced, containing more fat and less carbohydrate than recommended. Most children and adolescents revealed adequate body mass index and suitable body fat percentage. Two-thirds of them showed moderate or poor KIDMED index, the case of girls being remarkable. When the GF diet, containing GF-rendered foodstuffs, was compared to a similar type of diet but substituting GF products with their analogs containing gluten, important nutritional differences were revealed. Even though celiac children and adolescents' diet is unhealthy due to its inappropriate dietary pattern, following a diet based on GF products raises extra difficulty in complying with the nutritional recommendations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 35%
Unspecified 7 27%
Student > Bachelor 6 23%
Student > Postgraduate 1 4%
Researcher 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 46%
Unspecified 7 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,384,125
of 12,799,521 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#1,204
of 1,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,429
of 274,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#85
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,799,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.