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Rapid declines in coronary heart disease mortality in Eastern Europe are associated with increased consumption of oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, October 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 1,129)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Rapid declines in coronary heart disease mortality in Eastern Europe are associated with increased consumption of oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, October 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10654-007-9195-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Witold Zatonski, Hannia Campos, Walter Willett

Abstract

During the 1980's, opposing time trends were observed in coronary heart disease (CHD) rates between Eastern and Western European countries. In all former socialistic economic countries, CHD was uniformly increasing or stable, but a steady decline in CHD was observed in Western European countries. Surprisingly, during the 1990's CHD mortality substantially decreased in some Eastern European countries but not in others. These changes were accompanied by major shifts in food consumption, including the type of vegetable oils used by the population. There are two major vegetable oils consumed in Eastern Europe (rapeseed and sunflower) that differ greatly in their content of n-3 fatty acids, specifically alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Low ALA intake has been associated with risk of fatal CHD and sudden cardiac death. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in CHD in eleven Eastern European countries to identify whether national changes in vegetable oil consumption after 1990 were associated with changes in CHD mortality rates. Our data show that countries which experienced an increase in ALA consumption also experienced a substantial decline in CHD mortality. These results were consistent in men and women. We hypothesize that the decline in CHD mortality observed in Eastern Europe can be attributed, in part, to changes in ALA consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 29 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 5 16%
Other 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Professor 3 9%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 25%
Unspecified 4 13%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 81. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2018.
All research outputs
#192,205
of 13,093,005 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#27
of 1,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,698
of 277,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,093,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,630 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.