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Imaging for suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy—what about the fetal dose? A comprehensive review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in Insights Into Imaging, October 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Imaging for suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy—what about the fetal dose? A comprehensive review of the literature
Published in
Insights Into Imaging, October 2010
DOI 10.1007/s13244-010-0043-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tilo Niemann, Guillaume Nicolas, Hans W. Roser, Jan Müller-Brand, Georg Bongartz

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of fetal doses reported in the literature when imaging the pregnant woman with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). METHODS: A comprehensive literature search in the PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases yielded a total of 1,687 papers that were included in the analysis and have been analysed with regard to fetal dose in suspected PE radiological imaging strategies. RESULTS: Fetal dose in chest computed tomography (CT) ranges between 0.013 and 0.026 mGy in early and 0.06-0.1 mGy in late pregnancy compared with 99mTc-MAA perfusion scintigraphy with a fetal dose of 0.1-0.6 mGy in early and 0.6-0.8 mGy in late pregnancy. (99m)Tc-aerosol ventilation scintigraphy results in 0.1-0.3 mGy. However, there is concern about female breast irradiation in CT, which is higher than in scintigraphy. CT radiation risks for breast tissue remain unclear. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of dosimetry and radiation risks is crucial in the radiological work-up of suspected PE in pregnancy. It is reasonable to reserve scintigraphy for pregnant patients with normal chest radiography findings and no history of asthma or chronic lung disease. Performing CT applying dose reduction instead of scintigraphy will minimise fetal radiation dose and maximise the diagnostic value.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 21%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 62%
Physics and Astronomy 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,513,520
of 22,789,076 outputs
Outputs from Insights Into Imaging
#259
of 936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,819
of 99,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Insights Into Imaging
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,789,076 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 936 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 99,193 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.