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Sex differences in the association of psychological status with measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in adults with type 2 diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Diabetologica, March 2018
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38 Mendeley
Title
Sex differences in the association of psychological status with measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in adults with type 2 diabetes
Published in
Acta Diabetologica, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00592-018-1132-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liliana Indelicato, Marco Dauriz, Elisabetta Bacchi, Silvia Donà, Lorenza Santi, Carlo Negri, Vittorio Cacciatori, Enzo Bonora, Arie Nouwen, Paolo Moghetti

Abstract

To assess the association of psychological variables on leisure-time physical activity and sedentary time in men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated 163 patients with T2D, consecutively recruited at the Diabetes Centre of the Verona General Hospital. Scores on depression and anxiety symptoms, psychosocial factors (including self-efficacy, perceived interference, perceived severity, social support, misguided support behaviour, spouse's positive behaviour), physical activity and time spent sitting were ascertained using questionnaires responses to the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire, International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Physical activity was significantly associated with higher social support in women and with increased self-efficacy in men. Sedentary time was significantly associated with higher perceived interference, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and with reduced diabetes self-efficacy in women, while it was associated solely with anxiety in men. Depressive symptoms and self-efficacy in women and anxiety symptoms in men were independent predictors of sedentary time when entered in a multivariable regression model also including age, BMI, haemoglobin A1c, diabetes duration, perceived interference and self-efficacy as covariates. Lower self-efficacy and higher symptoms of depression were closely associated with increased sedentary time in women, but not in men, with T2D. It is possible that individualized behavioural interventions designed to reduce depressive symptoms and to improve diabetes self-efficacy would ultimately reduce sedentary behaviours, particularly in women with T2D.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 14 37%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 16 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Psychology 4 11%
Sports and Recreations 4 11%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,159,348
of 12,712,180 outputs
Outputs from Acta Diabetologica
#330
of 504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,162
of 273,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Diabetologica
#12
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,712,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 504 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.