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Electroantennogram, flight orientation, and oviposition responses of Aedes aegypti to the oviposition pheromone n-heneicosane

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology Research, November 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
Title
Electroantennogram, flight orientation, and oviposition responses of Aedes aegypti to the oviposition pheromone n-heneicosane
Published in
Parasitology Research, November 2008
DOI 10.1007/s00436-008-1263-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Seenivasagan, Kavita R. Sharma, K. Sekhar, K. Ganesan, Shri Prakash, R. Vijayaraghavan

Abstract

Oviposition pheromones specifically influence the females of many insects to lay eggs in the sites resulting in more egg deposition. A previous report describes the principal role of n-heneicosane (C(21)) identified and characterized from the larval cuticle of Aedes aegypti (L.) in attracting the gravid mosquitoes to oviposit in treated substrates among other chemical components. However, the means by which this compound is perceived by the females for oviposition has not been reported. In this study, we have recorded the peripheral olfactory responses from the antenna of Ae. aegypti from 10(-7) g to 10(-3) g doses of n-heneicosane. The EAG response of female mosquitoes increased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing stimulus strength. In the orientation assay using Y-maze olfactometer, female mosquitoes were attracted to the odor plume of 10(-6) g and 10(-5) g dose, while the higher dose of 10(-3) g plume enforced repellency to gravid mosquitoes. The response to oviposition substrates by gravid Ae. aegypti females differed across the range of concentrations of n-heneicosane under multiple choice conditions, larger number of eggs were deposited in 10 ppm (10 mg/l) solutions compared to lower and higher concentrations indicating 10 ppm was most attractive. Application of n-heneicosane at 10 ppm in breeding habitats will be a useful method to attract the gravid mosquitoes using ovitraps for surveillance and monitoring. The possible use of this compound in monitoring of mosquito population in endemic areas in relevance to integrated vector management strategies is discussed in detail.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Madagascar 1 1%
Unknown 86 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 23%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 11%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Engineering 3 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,703,132
of 12,689,756 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology Research
#305
of 2,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,013
of 274,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology Research
#12
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,689,756 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,525 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.