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Vibration as an exercise modality: how it may work, and what its potential might be

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, December 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
362 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
387 Mendeley
Title
Vibration as an exercise modality: how it may work, and what its potential might be
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, December 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00421-009-1303-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jörn Rittweger

Abstract

Whilst exposure to vibration is traditionally regarded as perilous, recent research has focussed on potential benefits. Here, the physical principles of forced oscillations are discussed in relation to vibration as an exercise modality. Acute physiological responses to isolated tendon and muscle vibration and to whole body vibration exercise are reviewed, as well as the training effects upon the musculature, bone mineral density and posture. Possible applications in sports and medicine are discussed. Evidence suggests that acute vibration exercise seems to elicit a specific warm-up effect, and that vibration training seems to improve muscle power, although the potential benefits over traditional forms of resistive exercise are still unclear. Vibration training also seems to improve balance in sub-populations prone to fall, such as frail elderly people. Moreover, literature suggests that vibration is beneficial to reduce chronic lower back pain and other types of pain. Other future indications are perceivable.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 387 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Spain 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 363 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 81 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 18%
Student > Bachelor 46 12%
Researcher 44 11%
Professor 26 7%
Other 121 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 100 26%
Sports and Recreations 93 24%
Unspecified 51 13%
Engineering 35 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 9%
Other 74 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2010.
All research outputs
#3,498,554
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#1,168
of 2,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,877
of 273,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#25
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,893 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.