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Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs: an accuracy and feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in Skeletal Radiology, November 2017
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Title
Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs: an accuracy and feasibility study
Published in
Skeletal Radiology, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00256-017-2810-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Hakimian, Amal Khoury, Rami Mosheiff, Meir Liebergall, Yoram A. Weil

Abstract

Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA© software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 30%
Researcher 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 6 30%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 15%
Unspecified 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,942,127
of 12,662,942 outputs
Outputs from Skeletal Radiology
#423
of 727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,137
of 314,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Skeletal Radiology
#27
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,662,942 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 727 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,830 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.