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25-year Trends and Socio-demographic Differences in Response Rates: Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, June 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources

Citations

dimensions_citation
155 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
25-year Trends and Socio-demographic Differences in Response Rates: Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, June 2006
DOI 10.1007/s10654-006-9019-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanna Tolonen, Satu Helakorpi, Kirsi Talala, Ville Helasoja, Tuija Martelin, Ritva Prättälä

Abstract

When estimating population level changes in health indicators, the declining response rate, especially if also the characteristics of non-respondents are changing may bias the outcome. There is evidence that survey response rates are declining in many countries. It is also known that respondents and non-respondents differ in their socio-economic and demographic status as well as in their health and health behaviours. There is no information about the changes in the differences between respondents and non-respondents over time. Our purpose was to investigate the changes over time in the differences between respondents and non-respondents in respect to their sex, age, marital status and educational level. The data from the Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey (1978-2002) was used. The response rate declined over the past 25 years for both men and women in all age groups. The decline was faster among men than women, and also faster in younger age groups than older age groups. There is a marked difference in the response rate between married and non-married persons but it did not change over time. Also the response rate between different educational levels differed for both men and women, and this difference increased over the years. The declining response rate and at the same time occurring change in the non-respondent characteristics will decrease the representativeness of the results, limit the comparability of the results with other surveys, increase the bias of the trend estimates and limit the comparability of the results between population groups.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 19%
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Other 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 27%
Social Sciences 12 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 17%
Psychology 3 6%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,297,174
of 12,883,634 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#272
of 1,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,540
of 275,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#5
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,883,634 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,117 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.