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Gender Nonconformity and Psychological Distress in Lesbians and Gay Men

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
108 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
Title
Gender Nonconformity and Psychological Distress in Lesbians and Gay Men
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2006
DOI 10.1007/s10508-006-9108-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. Christopher Skidmore, Joan A. W. Linsenmeier, J. Michael Bailey

Abstract

Some lesbians and gay men tend to be more gender nonconforming, on average and for certain traits, than their heterosexual counterparts. Gender nonconformity in childhood has also been linked to adult homosexuality. Studies of both lesbians and gay men also find elevated rates of psychological distress. We hypothesized that these facts may be related. Individuals who violate social norms for gender-appropriate behavior may suffer from stigmatization by both heterosexual and homosexual people, leading to higher levels of psychological distress. We examined whether several measures of gender nonconformity were related to psychological distress in a community-based sample of gay men and lesbians. These included self-reports of childhood and adulthood gender nonconformity, as well as observer ratings of current behavior. Several measures of gender nonconformity were related to each other for both lesbians and gay men. In addition, gender nonconformity was related to psychological distress, but only for gay men. Finally, both lesbian and gay male participants reported more positive attitudes towards gender conformity than nonconformity, although the pattern was somewhat different for each group. We discuss the implications of these results for future studies of gender nonconformity and for the promotion of psychological health in lesbians and gay men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 8%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 120 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 23%
Student > Bachelor 23 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 13%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Master 13 10%
Other 32 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 69 52%
Social Sciences 28 21%
Unspecified 12 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 8%
Arts and Humanities 5 4%
Other 8 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,457,558
of 13,727,418 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#1,249
of 2,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,058
of 279,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#22
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,727,418 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,542 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,760 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.