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Adansonia digitata and Adansonia gregorii fruit shells serve as a protection against high temperatures experienced during wildfires

Overview of attention for article published in Botanical Studies, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 103)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Adansonia digitata and Adansonia gregorii fruit shells serve as a protection against high temperatures experienced during wildfires
Published in
Botanical Studies, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40529-018-0223-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Kempe, Christoph Neinhuis, Thea Lautenschläger

Abstract

The thick and woody shell of the fruit of Adansonia species cannot be explained solely by adaptation to zoochory or hydrochory. Since the trunks of Adansonia possess a thick and fire-resistant bark and wildfires occur regularly in its habitat (savannah), we examined with the African Adanonia digitata and the Australian Adansonia gregorii whether the fruit offers protection against high heat typically experienced in wildfires. Heat-resistance tests were conducted by applying a simple heat test based on known temperature and temperature residence times occurring in savannah fires and complemented by tests to reveal the impact of heat on germination since long-term seed dormancy is known for Adansonia. Germination tests with acid treated and heat treated seeds were performed to establish if heat also increased germination rate as effectively as acid treatments have been found to do. Heat was found to increase germination rate, but not as effectively as treatment with acid, therefore fruits exposed to high temperatures experienced in wildfires may have a better chance of germination than fruits that were not exposed to wildfires. The ability of the investigated fruits to protect seeds from high temperatures suggests that wildfires may have played a role in the evolution of the hard-shell structure typically found in Adansonia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Lecturer 2 13%
Other 3 20%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 60%
Unspecified 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,071,284
of 12,612,351 outputs
Outputs from Botanical Studies
#17
of 103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,202
of 272,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Botanical Studies
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,612,351 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.