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Sex Differences in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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123 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
210 Mendeley
Title
Sex Differences in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10803-006-0331-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice S. Carter, David O. Black, Sonia Tewani, Christine E. Connolly, Mary Beth Kadlec, Helen Tager-Flusberg

Abstract

Although autism spectrum disorders (ASD) prevalence is higher in males than females, few studies address sex differences in developmental functioning or clinical manifestations. Participants in this study of sex differences in developmental profiles and clinical symptoms were 22 girls and 68 boys with ASD (mean age = 28 months). All children achieved strongest performance in visual reception and fine motor followed by gross motor and language functioning. Sex differences emerged in developmental profiles. Controlling for language, girls achieved higher visual reception scores than boys; boys attained higher language and motor scores and higher social-competence ratings than girls, particularly when controlling for visual reception. Longitudinal, representative studies are needed to elucidate the developmental and etiological significance of the observed sex differences.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 210 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 200 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 19%
Student > Bachelor 34 16%
Student > Master 34 16%
Researcher 34 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 55 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 99 47%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 16%
Unspecified 22 10%
Social Sciences 18 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 6%
Other 26 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2013.
All research outputs
#3,535,682
of 12,316,253 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#1,627
of 3,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,874
of 266,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#40
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,476 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.