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Ventilatory responses of the clown knifefish, Chitala ornata, to hypercarbia and hypercapnia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, March 2018
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Title
Ventilatory responses of the clown knifefish, Chitala ornata, to hypercarbia and hypercapnia
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00360-018-1150-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dang Diem Tuong, Brittney Borowiec, Alexander M. Clifford, Renato Filogonio, Derek Somo, Do Thi Thanh Huong, Nguyen Thanh Phuong, Tobias Wang, Mark Bayley, William K. Milsom

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of externally versus internally oriented CO2/H+-sensitive chemoreceptors in promoting cardiorespiratory responses to environmental hypercarbia in the facultative air-breathing fish, Chitala ornata (the clown knifefish). Fish were exposed to environmental acidosis (pH ~ 6.0) or hypercarbia (≈ 30 torr PCO2) that produced changes in water pH equal to the pH levels of the acidotic water to distinguish the relative roles of CO2 versus H+. We also injected acetazolamide to elevate arterial levels of PCO2 and [H+] in fish in normocarbic water to distinguish between internal and external stimuli. We measured changes in gill ventilation frequency, air breathing frequency, heart rate and arterial blood pressure in response to each treatment as well as the changes produced in arterial PCO2 and pH. Exposure to normocarbic water of pH 6.0 for 1 h did not produce significant changes in any measured variable. Exposure to hypercarbic water dramatically increased air breathing frequency, but had no effect on gill ventilation. Hypercarbia also produced a modest bradycardia and fall in arterial blood pressure. Injection of acetazolamide produced similar effects. Both hypercarbia and acetazolamide led to increases in arterial PCO2 and falls in arterial pH although the changes in arterial PCO2/pH were more modest following acetazolamide injection as were the increases in air breathing frequency. The acetazolamide results suggest that the stimulation of air breathing was due, at least in part, to stimulation of internally oriented CO2/H+ chemoreceptors monitoring blood gas changes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 40%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 60%
Environmental Science 1 10%
Social Sciences 1 10%
Unknown 2 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,192,367
of 13,353,516 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#365
of 511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,750
of 269,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,353,516 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 511 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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