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Ectoparasites, uropygial glands and hatching success in birds

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, December 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Facebook page
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2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
Title
Ectoparasites, uropygial glands and hatching success in birds
Published in
Oecologia, December 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00442-009-1548-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Pape Møller, Johannes Erritzøe, Lajos Rózsa

Abstract

The uropygial gland of birds secretes wax that is applied to the plumage, where the secretions are hypothesized to eliminate fungi and bacteria, thereby potentially providing important benefits in terms of plumage maintenance. We analyzed variation in size of the uropygial gland in 212 species of birds to determine the function and the ecological correlates of variation in gland size. Bird species with larger uropygial glands had more genera of chewing lice of the sub-order Amblycera, but not of the sub-order Ischnocera, and more feather mites. There was a fitness advantage associated with relatively large uropygial glands because such species had higher hatching success. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the uropygial gland functions to manage the community of microorganisms, and that certain taxa of chewing lice have diverged as a consequence of these defenses.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Hungary 2 2%
New Zealand 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Romania 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 75 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 33%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Researcher 10 12%
Professor 6 7%
Other 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 74%
Unspecified 9 10%
Environmental Science 8 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,379,267
of 12,221,475 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#952
of 2,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,581
of 270,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#27
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,475 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.