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Exploring the Link Between Daily Relationship Quality, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Couples

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
27 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Exploring the Link Between Daily Relationship Quality, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Couples
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10508-018-1175-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marieke Dewitte, Axel Mayer

Abstract

Current models of sexual responding emphasize the role of contextual and relational factors in shaping sexual behavior. The present study used a prospective diary design to examine the temporal sequence and variability of the link between sexual and relationship variables in a sample of couples. Studying sexual responding in the everyday context of the relationship is necessary to get research more aligned with the complex reality of having sex in a relationship, thereby increasing ecological validity and taking into account the dyadic interplay between partners. Over the course of 21 days, 66 couples reported every day on their sexual desire, sexual activity (every morning), and relationship quality (every evening). In addition, we examined whether the link between these daily variables was moderated by relationship duration, having children, general relationship satisfaction, and sexual functioning. Results showed that the sexual responses of women depended on the relationship context, mainly when having children and being in a longer relationship. Male sexual responding depended less on contextual factors but did vary by level of sexual functioning. Several cross-partner effects were found as well. These results verify that relational and sexual variables feed forward into each other, indicating the need to incorporate interpersonal dynamics into current models of sexual responding and to take into account variability and dyadic influences between partners.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 52%
Social Sciences 6 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,032,022
of 13,622,595 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#603
of 2,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,637
of 270,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#12
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,622,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.