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Prognostic Impact of Bacterobilia on Morbidity and Postoperative Management After Pancreatoduodenectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgery, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
Title
Prognostic Impact of Bacterobilia on Morbidity and Postoperative Management After Pancreatoduodenectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Published in
World Journal of Surgery, February 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00268-018-4546-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin Müssle, Sebastian Hempel, Christoph Kahlert, Marius Distler, Jürgen Weitz, Thilo Welsch

Abstract

Intraoperative bile analysis during pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is performed routinely at specialized centers worldwide. However, it remains controversial if and how intraoperative bacterobilia during PD affects morbidity and its management. The aim of the study was a systematic review and meta-analysis of intraoperative bacterobilia and its impact on patient outcome after PD. Five relevant outcomes of interest were defined, and a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. A total of 28 studies (8523 patients) were included. The median incidence of bacterobilia was 58% (interquartile range 51-67%). The most frequently isolated bacteria were Enterococcus species (51%), Klebsiella species (28%), and Escherichia coli (27%). Preoperative biliary drainage was significantly associated with bacterobilia (86 vs. 25%; RR 3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.42-4.42; p < 0.001). The incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) was significantly increased in cases with bacterobilia (RR 2.84; 95% CI 2.17-3.73; p < 0.001). Postoperative pancreatic fistula, overall postoperative morbidity, and mortality were not significantly influenced. Identical bacteria in bile and the infectious sources were found in 48% (interquartile range 34-59%) of the cases. Bacterobilia is detected during almost every second PD and is associated with an increased rate of SSI. The microbiome from intraoperative bile and postoperative infectious sources match in ~50% of patients, providing the option of early administration of calculated antibiotics and the determination of resistance patterns.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 33%
Unspecified 2 22%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Chemistry 2 22%
Engineering 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,772,492
of 13,599,641 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgery
#708
of 2,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,640
of 270,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgery
#31
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,599,641 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,215 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.