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TV viewing and incident venous thromboembolism: the Atherosclerotic Risk in Communities Study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 543)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
TV viewing and incident venous thromboembolism: the Atherosclerotic Risk in Communities Study
Published in
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, February 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11239-018-1620-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasuhiko Kubota, Mary Cushman, Neil Zakai, Wayne D. Rosamond, Aaron R. Folsom

Abstract

TV viewing is associated with risk of arterial vascular diseases, but has not been evaluated in relation to venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in Western populations. In 1987-1989, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study obtained information on the frequency of TV viewing in participants aged 45-64 and followed them prospectively. In individuals free of prebaseline VTE (n = 15, 158), we used a Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident VTE according to frequency of TV viewing ("Never or seldom", "Sometimes", "Often" or "Very often"). During the 299,767 person-years of follow-up, we identified 691 VTE events. In a multivariable-adjusted model, the frequency of TV viewing showed a positive dose-response relation with VTE incidence (P for trend = 0.036), in which "very often" viewing TV carried 1.71 (95% CI 1.26-2.32) times the risk of VTE compared with "never or seldom" viewing TV. This association to some degree was mediated by obesity (25% mediation, 95% CI 10.7-27.5). Even among individuals who met a recommended level of physical activity, viewing TV "very often" carried 1.80 (1.04-3.09) times the risk of VTE, compared to viewing TV "never or seldom". Greater frequency of TV viewing was independently associated with increased risk of VTE, partially mediated by obesity. Achieving a recommended physical activity level did not eliminate the increased VTE risk associated with frequent TV viewing. Avoiding frequent TV viewing as well as increasing physical activity and controlling body weight might be beneficial for VTE prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 40%
Researcher 2 40%
Student > Master 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%
Psychology 1 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%
Materials Science 1 20%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 270. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2019.
All research outputs
#43,500
of 13,243,473 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
#1
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,307
of 269,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,243,473 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 543 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.