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Macronutrient composition and food groups associated with gestational weight gain: the GUSTO study

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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9 Mendeley
Title
Macronutrient composition and food groups associated with gestational weight gain: the GUSTO study
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, February 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00394-018-1623-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun S. Lai, Shu E. Soh, See Ling Loy, Marjorelee Colega, Michael S. Kramer, Jerry K. Y. Chan, Thiam Chye Tan, Lynnette P. C. Shek, Fabian K. P. Yap, Kok Hian Tan, Keith M. Godfrey, Yap Seng Chong, Mary F. F. Chong

Abstract

To examine the associations of energy, macronutrient and food intakes with GWG on 960 pregnant women from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) mother-offspring cohort. Dietary intake was assessed at 26-28 weeks' gestation with a 24-hour recall and 3-day food diary. GWG z-scores were calculated from first (4-13 weeks' gestation) and last (30-40 weeks gestation) measured weights; inadequate and excessive GWG were defined using the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on weights between 15 and 35 weeks' gestation. Associations were examined using substitution models for macronutrient composition, with linear or multinomial logistic regressions. Mean ± SD daily energy intake was 1868 ± 598 kcal, and percentage energy intakes were 51.8 ± 8.9% from carbohydrate, 15.7 ± 3.9% from protein and 32.6 ± 7.7% from fat. Higher energy intake (per 500 kcal increment) was associated with 0.18 SD higher GWG. In isocaloric diets, higher-carbohydrate and lower-fat intakes (at 5% energy substitution) were associated with 0.07 SD higher GWG, and 14% higher likelihood of excessive GWG. Concordantly, the highest tertile of carbohydrate-rich foods intake was associated with 0.20 SD higher GWG, but the highest tertile of fruit and vegetable intake was independently associated with 60% lower likelihood of inadequate GWG. Additionally, the highest tertile of dairy intake was associated with 0.18 SD lower GWG; and the highest tertile of plant-based protein foods intake was associated with 60% and 34% lower likelihood of inadequate and excessive GWG. Balancing the proportions of carbohydrates and fat, and a higher intake of plant-based protein foods may be beneficial for achieving optimal GWG.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Professor 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 44%
Psychology 2 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,747,532
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#380
of 1,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,589
of 271,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#37
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.