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Sibling Sex Ratio and Sexual Orientation in Men and Women: New Tests in Two National Probability Samples

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, February 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
3 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Sibling Sex Ratio and Sexual Orientation in Men and Women: New Tests in Two National Probability Samples
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, February 2005
DOI 10.1007/s10508-005-1005-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony F. Bogaert

Abstract

One line of research on the etiology of sexual orientation has examined sibling sex ratio, the ratio of brothers to sisters collectively reported by a group of individuals, but this research has only used clinical and/or convenience samples. In the present study, homosexual men and women's sibling sex ratio was examined in two national probability samples. Results indicated that homosexual men had a sex ratio of 129.54 male live births to 100 female live births. This ratio was within the range of elevated sex ratios found in some previous studies of homosexual men, although it was only marginally significant (p = .09) relative to the known human sex ratio with regard to live births. Additional analyses indicated that this effect was likely the result of a high fraternal birth order (i.e., an elevated number of older brothers) in homosexual men. The sibling sex ratio for lesbians was 122.58 male live births to 100 female live births, which did not significantly differ from the known human sex ratio with regard to live births. The results for lesbians, however, should be interpreted with caution because the sample size (and resulting power) was low. The results in men add to research suggesting that homosexual men, unselected for gender identity or gender role behavior, do not have elevated sibling sex ratios. These results also suggest that research should concentrate on finding the cause(s) of the fraternal birth order effect, the consistent finding that homosexual men have an elevated number of older brothers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 7%
Poland 1 3%
Unknown 26 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Unspecified 4 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 14%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 9 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 45%
Social Sciences 4 14%
Unspecified 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2019.
All research outputs
#925,594
of 13,628,925 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#540
of 2,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,318
of 279,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#15
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,925 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.