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The Vestibular System Mediates Sensation of Low-Frequency Sounds in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, September 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 262)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
The Vestibular System Mediates Sensation of Low-Frequency Sounds in Mice
Published in
Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, September 2010
DOI 10.1007/s10162-010-0230-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gareth P. Jones, Victoria A. Lukashkina, Ian J. Russell, Andrei N. Lukashkin

Abstract

The mammalian inner ear contains sense organs responsible for detecting sound, gravity and linear acceleration, and angular acceleration. Of these organs, the cochlea is involved in hearing, while the sacculus and utriculus serve to detect linear acceleration. Recent evidence from birds and mammals, including humans, has shown that the sacculus, a hearing organ in many lower vertebrates, has retained some of its ancestral acoustic sensitivity. Here we provide not only more evidence for the retained acoustic sensitivity of the sacculus, but we also found that acoustic stimulation of the sacculus has behavioral significance in mammals. We show that the amplitude of an elicited auditory startle response is greater when the startle stimuli are presented simultaneously with a low-frequency masker, including masker tones that are outside the sensitivity range of the cochlea. Masker-enhanced auditory startle responses were also observed in otoconia-absent Nox3 mice, which lack otoconia but have no obvious cochlea pathology. However, masker enhancement was not observed in otoconia-absent Nox3 mice if the low-frequency masker tones were outside the sensitivity range of the cochlea. This last observation confirms that otoconial organs, most likely the sacculus, contribute to behavioral responses to low-frequency sounds in mice.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Belgium 1 4%
Unknown 23 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 35%
Researcher 5 19%
Other 4 15%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 31%
Neuroscience 4 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Unspecified 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2012.
All research outputs
#3,685,087
of 12,640,315 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#47
of 262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,722
of 275,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,640,315 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 262 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them