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The influence of gender on symptoms associated with obstructive sleep apnea

Overview of attention for article published in Sleep and Breathing, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
Title
The influence of gender on symptoms associated with obstructive sleep apnea
Published in
Sleep and Breathing, February 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11325-017-1612-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos Alberto Nigro, Eduardo Dibur, Eduardo Borsini, Silvana Malnis, Glenda Ernst, Ignacio Bledel, Sergio González, Anabella Arce, Facundo Nogueira

Abstract

It has been reported that the clinical expression of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may differ in women and men. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of gender on reported OSA-related symptoms in a large clinical population of patients. The database from the sleep laboratory of a tertiary care center was examined. Adult patients who had undergone a diagnostic polysomnography and completed the Berlin questionnaire, a sleep questionnaire, and the Epworth sleepiness scale were selected. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between OSA-associated symptoms and different potential explanatory variables. The study sample included 1084 patients, median age was 53 years, 46.5% (504) were women, 72.7% (788) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index ≥ 5), and 31.2% were obese. After adjusting for age, body mass index, and apnea/hypopnea index, men were more likely to report snoring (OR 4.06, p < 0.001), habitual or loud snoring (OR 2.34, p < 0.001; 2.14, p < 0.001, respectively) and apneas (OR 2.44, p < 0.001), than women. After controlling for multiple variables, female gender was an independent predictive factor for reported tiredness (OR 0.57, p 0.001), sleep onset insomnia (OR 0.59, p 0.0035), and morning headaches (OR 0.32, p < 0.001). Reports of excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturia, midnight insomnia, and subjective cognitive complaints were not significantly associated with gender. Women with OSA were more likely to report tiredness, initial insomnia, and morning headaches, and less likely to complain of typical OSA symptoms (snoring, apneas) than men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 20%
Researcher 4 16%
Other 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 16%
Psychology 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Unknown 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,993,035
of 12,510,237 outputs
Outputs from Sleep and Breathing
#63
of 772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,293
of 345,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sleep and Breathing
#5
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,510,237 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 772 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.