↓ Skip to main content

Waiting with Bated Breath: Opportunistic Orientation to Human Odor in the Malaria Mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is Modulated by Minute Changes in Carbon Dioxide Concentration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 1,415)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
Title
Waiting with Bated Breath: Opportunistic Orientation to Human Odor in the Malaria Mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is Modulated by Minute Changes in Carbon Dioxide Concentration
Published in
Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10886-014-0542-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ben Webster, Emerson S. Lacey, Ring T. Cardé

Abstract

Females of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, predominantly obtain blood meals within human dwellings. Being highly anthropophilic, human skin odor offers a reliable, host-specific cue, but the challenge posed by pervasive human odor found indoors from used clothing, bedding etc. remains unclear. Anopheles gambiae spends much of its adult life indoors, constantly exposed to human odor even when dwellings are unoccupied. In landing assays, we found that female mosquitoes respond very weakly to human skin odor alone, suggesting that, alone, it is an ineffective landing cue. Landing, however, was dramatically increased by addition of carbon dioxide at a range of concentrations above ambient. Indeed, this effect was seen even when carbon dioxide was just 0.015 % above ambient within the assay cage. The synergistic effect of added carbon dioxide quickly waned, thereby facilitating a highly adaptive "sit-and-wait" ambush strategy, wherein females ignore persistent human odor until a living human is present. Unexpectedly, landing rates in the presence of added carbon dioxide were almost as robust during daytime, when An. gambiae has previously been assumed inactive, possibly facilitating opportunistic feeding at times of day when human dwellings are occupied intermittently. We suggest earlier studies that showed strong upwind flight behavior toward human odor alone could, in fact, have been demonstrating orientation toward a human dwelling rather than toward a living human. This new interpretation of how human odors mediate upwind orientation and landing in An. gambiae is discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 32%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Master 13 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 68%
Neuroscience 5 6%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#181,635
of 12,318,771 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#13
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,999
of 266,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#2
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,318,771 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,705 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.