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Initial symptom presentation after high school football-related concussion varies by time point in a season: an initial investigation

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine - Open, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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31 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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34 Mendeley
Title
Initial symptom presentation after high school football-related concussion varies by time point in a season: an initial investigation
Published in
Sports Medicine - Open, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40798-018-0121-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin L. Brett, Andrew W. Kuhn, Aaron M. Yengo-Kahn, Zachary Y. Kerr, Christopher M. Bonfield, Gary S. Solomon, Scott L. Zuckerman

Abstract

Schedule-based and in-season factors (e.g., competition type) have been shown to be associated with symptom reporting patterns and injury severity in sport-related concussion (SRC). To determine if acute neurocognitive and symptom presentation following SRC differ by time point within a high school football season. Multicenter ambispective cohort of high school football players who sustained a SRC (N = 2594). Timing (early, mid, and late season) of SRC was based on median dates for the start of the pre-season, regular season, and playoffs of each states' football schedules. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) investigated differences across season period groups for: (1) neurocognitive test scores, (2) total symptom scores (TSS), and (3) individual symptom increases from baseline within 1-week post-injury. Significant group differences were observed in TSS, F(2, 2589) = 15.40, p <  0.001, ηp2 = 0.01, and individual symptom increases from baseline, F(2, 2591) = 16.40, p <  0.001, ηp2 = 0.01. Significant increases were seen from baseline to both midseason and late season in both TSS, χ2 = 24.40, p <  0.001, Φ = 0.10 and individual symptoms, χ2 = 10.32, p = 0.006, Φ = 0.10. Post hoc tests indicated a linear trend, with late-season injured athletes reporting approximately twice the TSS (13.10 vs. 6.77) and new symptoms (5.70 vs. 2.68) as those with early-season injuries. In a cohort of American high school football student-athletes, those suffering SRC in the late-season time period had increased acute symptom burden. SRC sustained later in-season may require more conservative management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 24%
Sports and Recreations 5 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 11 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#981,645
of 15,662,479 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine - Open
#64
of 228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,297
of 366,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine - Open
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,662,479 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 228 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them