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On the structural definition of amyloid fibrils and other polypeptide aggregates

Overview of attention for article published in Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences, May 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
159 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
On the structural definition of amyloid fibrils and other polypeptide aggregates
Published in
Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences, May 2007
DOI 10.1007/s00018-007-7110-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Fändrich

Abstract

Amyloid fibrils occur inside the human body, associated with ageing or a group of diseases that includes, amongst others, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and type II diabetes. Many natural polypeptide chains are able to form amyloid fibrils in vivo or in vitro, and this ability has been suggested to represent an inherent consequence of the chemical structure of the polypeptide chain. Recent literature has provided a wealth of information about the structure of aggregates, precipitates, amyloid fibrils and other types of fibrillar polypeptide assemblies. However, the biophysical meaning associated with these terms can differ considerably depending on the context of their usage. This overview presents a structural comparison of amyloid fibrils and other types of polypeptide assemblies and defines amyloid fibrils, based on structural considerations, as fibrillar polypeptide aggregates with a cross-beta conformation.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 195 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 29%
Student > Master 36 17%
Researcher 30 14%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 45 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 39%
Chemistry 31 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 14%
Unspecified 17 8%
Engineering 11 5%
Other 38 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2008.
All research outputs
#3,501,001
of 12,227,349 outputs
Outputs from Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences
#713
of 2,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,336
of 270,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences
#14
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,227,349 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,527 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,442 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.