↓ Skip to main content

A Technique for Thermal Desorption Analyses Suitable for Thermally-Labile, Volatile Compounds

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
A Technique for Thermal Desorption Analyses Suitable for Thermally-Labile, Volatile Compounds
Published in
Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10886-018-0924-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hans T. Alborn

Abstract

Many plant and insect interactions are governed by odors released by the plants or insects and there exists a continual need for new or improved methods to collect and identify these odors. Our group has for some time studied below-ground, plant-produced volatile signals affecting nematode and insect behavior. The research requires repeated sampling of volatiles of intact plant/soil systems in the laboratory as well as the field with the help of probes to minimize unwanted effects on the systems we are studying. After evaluating solid adsorbent filters with solvent extraction or solid phase micro extraction fiber sample collection, we found dynamic sampling of small air volumes on Tenax TA filters followed by thermal desorption sample introduction to be the most suitable analytical technique for our applications. Here we present the development and evaluation of a low-cost and relatively simple thermal desorption technique where a cold trap cooled with liquid carbon dioxide is added as an integral part of a splitless injector. Temperature gradient-based focusing and low thermal mass minimizes aerosol formation and eliminates the need for flash heating, resulting in low sample degradation comparable to solvent-based on-column injections. Additionally, since the presence of the cold trap does not affect normal splitless injections, on-the-fly switching between splitless and thermal desorption modes can be used for external standard quantification.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 50%
Researcher 3 30%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 90%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,080,341
of 12,881,446 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#1,083
of 1,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,465
of 344,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#11
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,881,446 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,772 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.