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Opioid use in pregnancy and parenting: An Indigenous-based, collaborative framework for Northwestern Ontario

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Public Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Opioid use in pregnancy and parenting: An Indigenous-based, collaborative framework for Northwestern Ontario
Published in
Canadian Journal of Public Health, January 2018
DOI 10.17269/cjph.108.5524
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naana Afua Jumah, Lisa Bishop, Mike Franklyn, Janet Gordon, Len Kelly, Sol Mamakwa, Terry O'Driscoll, Brieanne Olibris, Cynthia Olsen, Natalie Paavola, Susan Pilatzke, Brenda Small, Meldon Kahan

Abstract

Opioid use affects up to 30% of pregnancies in Northwestern Ontario. Health care providers in Northwestern Ontario have varying comfort levels providing care to substance-involved pregnant women. Furthermore, health care practitioners, social service agencies and community groups in Northwestern Ontario often work in isolation with little multidisciplinary communication and collaboration. This article describes two workshops that brought together health and social service providers, community organizations, as well as academic institutions and professional organizations involved in the care of substance-involved pregnant and parenting women. The initial workshop presented best practices and local experience in the management of opioid dependence in pregnancy while the second workshop asked participants to apply a local Indigenous worldview to the implementation of clinical, research and program priorities that were identified in the first workshop. Consensus statements developed by workshop participants identified improved transitions in care, facilitated access to buprenorphine treatment, stable funding models for addiction programs and a focus on Indigenous-led programming. Participants identified a critical need for a national strategy to address the effects of opioid use in pregnancy from a culturally safe, trauma-informed perspective that takes into account the health and well-being of the woman, her infant, her family and her community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 27%
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 14 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Psychology 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,156,349
of 13,549,568 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Public Health
#54
of 436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,577
of 349,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Public Health
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,549,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.