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Acceptance and commitment therapy for symptom interference in metastatic breast cancer patients: a pilot randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Acceptance and commitment therapy for symptom interference in metastatic breast cancer patients: a pilot randomized trial
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4045-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine E. Mosher, Ekin Secinti, Ruohong Li, Adam T. Hirsh, Jonathan Bricker, Kathy D. Miller, Bryan Schneider, Anna Maria Storniolo, Lida Mina, Erin V. Newton, Victoria L. Champion, Shelley A. Johns

Abstract

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. With medical advances, metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients often live for years with many symptoms that interfere with activities. However, there is a paucity of efficacious interventions to address symptom-related suffering and functional interference. Thus, this study examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of telephone-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for symptom interference with functioning in MBC patients. Symptomatic MBC patients (N = 47) were randomly assigned to six telephone sessions of ACT or six telephone sessions of education/support. Patients completed measures of symptom interference and measures assessing the severity of pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. The eligibility screening rate (64%) and high retention (83% at 8 weeks post-baseline) demonstrated feasibility. When examining within-group change, ACT participants showed decreases in symptom interference (i.e., fatigue interference and sleep-related impairment; Cohen's d range = - 0.23 to - 0.31) at 8 and 12 weeks post-baseline, whereas education/support participants showed minimal change in these outcomes (d range = - 0.03 to 0.07). Additionally, at 12 weeks post-baseline, ACT participants showed moderate decreases in fatigue and sleep disturbance (both ds = - 0.43), whereas education/support participants showed small decreases in these outcomes (ds = - 0.24 and - 0.18 for fatigue and sleep disturbance, respectively). Both the ACT and education/support groups showed reductions in depressive symptoms (ds = - 0.27 and - 0.28) at 12 weeks post-baseline. Group differences in all outcomes were not statistically significant. ACT shows feasibility and promise in improving fatigue and sleep-related outcomes in MBC patients and warrants further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Unspecified 5 9%
Sports and Recreations 3 5%
Other 9 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,086,290
of 13,514,418 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#736
of 2,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,095
of 349,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#41
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,514,418 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,156 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.