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Beneficial Mutations from Evolution Experiments Increase Rates of Growth and Fermentation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Molecular Evolution, January 2018
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17 Mendeley
Title
Beneficial Mutations from Evolution Experiments Increase Rates of Growth and Fermentation
Published in
Journal of Molecular Evolution, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00239-018-9829-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aysha L. Sezmis, Martino E. Malerba, Dustin J. Marshall, Michael J. McDonald

Abstract

A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how beneficial mutations translate into increased fitness. Here, we study beneficial mutations that arise in experimental populations of yeast evolved in glucose-rich media. We find that fitness increases are caused by enhanced maximum growth rate (R) that come at the cost of reduced yield (K). We show that for some of these mutants, high R coincides with higher rates of ethanol secretion, suggesting that higher growth rates are due to an increased preference to utilize glucose through the fermentation pathway, instead of respiration. We examine the performance of mutants across gradients of glucose and nitrogen concentrations and show that the preference for fermentation over respiration is influenced by the availability of glucose and nitrogen. Overall, our data show that selection for high growth rates can lead to an enhanced Crabtree phenotype by the way of beneficial mutations that permit aerobic fermentation at a greater range of glucose concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 24%
Unspecified 3 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 29%
Unspecified 4 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,478,932
of 12,406,609 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#930
of 1,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,347
of 339,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#8
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,406,609 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,638 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.