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Promoter analysis of the fish gene of slow/cardiac-type myosin heavy chain implicated in specification of muscle fiber types

Overview of attention for article published in Fish Physiology and Biochemistry, January 2018
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Title
Promoter analysis of the fish gene of slow/cardiac-type myosin heavy chain implicated in specification of muscle fiber types
Published in
Fish Physiology and Biochemistry, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10695-018-0463-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shigeharu Kinoshita, Saltuk Bugrahan Ceyhun, Asaduzzamann Md, Bhuiyan Sharmin Siddique, Dadasaheb B. Akolkar, Shuichi Asakawa, Shugo Watabe

Abstract

Vertebrate skeletal muscles consist of heterogeneous tissues containing various types of muscle fibers, where specification of the fiber type is crucial for muscle development. Fish are an attractive experimental model to study the mechanisms of such fiber type specification because of the separated localization of slow and fast muscles in the trunk myotome. We examined regulation of expression of the torafugu gene of slow/cardiac-type myosin heavy chain, MYH M5 , and isolated an operational promoter in order to force its tissue-specific expression across different fish species via the transgenic approach in zebrafish and medaka. This promoter activity was observed in adaxial cell-derived superficial slow muscle fibers under the control of a hedgehog signal. We also uncovered coordinated expression of MYH M5 and Sox6b, which is an important transcriptional repressor for specification of muscle fiber types and participates in hedgehog signaling. Sequence comparison in the 5'-flanking region identified three conserved regions, CSR1-CSR3, between torafugu MYH M5 and its zebrafish ortholog. Analysis of deletion mutants showed that CSR1 significantly stimulates gene expression in slow muscle fibers. In contrast, deletion of CSR3 resulted in ectopic expression of a reporter gene in fast muscle fibers. CSR3 was found to contain a putative Sox family protein-binding site. These results indicate that the dual mechanism causing inhibition in fast muscle fibers and activation in slow muscle fibers is essential for slow muscle fiber-specific gene expression in fish.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 33%
Professor 2 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 33%
Unspecified 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,289,572
of 12,689,756 outputs
Outputs from Fish Physiology and Biochemistry
#277
of 459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#293,679
of 345,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fish Physiology and Biochemistry
#11
of 25 outputs
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