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Sociability modifies dogs’ sensitivity to biological motion of different social relevance

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
Title
Sociability modifies dogs’ sensitivity to biological motion of different social relevance
Published in
Animal Cognition, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10071-018-1160-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuko Ishikawa, Daniel Mills, Alexander Willmott, David Mullineaux, Kun Guo

Abstract

Preferential attention to living creatures is believed to be an intrinsic capacity of the visual system of several species, with perception of biological motion often studied and, in humans, it correlates with social cognitive performance. Although domestic dogs are exceptionally attentive to human social cues, it is unknown whether their sociability is associated with sensitivity to conspecific and heterospecific biological motion cues of different social relevance. We recorded video clips of point-light displays depicting a human or dog walking in either frontal or lateral view. In a preferential looking paradigm, dogs spontaneously viewed 16 paired point-light displays showing combinations of normal/inverted (control condition), human/dog and frontal/lateral views. Overall, dogs looked significantly longer at frontal human point-light display versus the inverted control, probably due to its clearer social/biological relevance. Dogs' sociability, assessed through owner-completed questionnaires, further revealed that low-sociability dogs preferred the lateral point-light display view, whereas high-sociability dogs preferred the frontal view. Clearly, dogs can recognize biological motion, but their preference is influenced by their sociability and the stimulus salience, implying biological motion perception may reflect aspects of dogs' social cognition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 6 25%
Researcher 4 17%
Other 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 33%
Psychology 6 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 13%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Unspecified 2 8%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,706,079
of 12,452,101 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#328
of 920 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,405
of 372,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#7
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,452,101 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 920 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,943 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.