↓ Skip to main content

Do the more educated utilize more health care services? Evidence from Vietnam using a regression discontinuity design

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Economics and Management, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Do the more educated utilize more health care services? Evidence from Vietnam using a regression discontinuity design
Published in
International Journal of Health Economics and Management, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10754-018-9233-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thang Dang

Abstract

In 1991, Vietnam implemented a compulsory primary schooling reform that provides this study a natural experiment to estimate the causal effect of education on health care utilization with a regression discontinuity design. This paper finds that education causes statistically significant impacts on health care utilization, although the signs of the impacts change with specific types of health care services examined. In particular, education increases the inpatient utilization of the public health sector, but it reduces the outpatient utilization of both the public and private health sectors. The estimates are strongly robust to various windows of the sample choice. The paper also discovers that the links between education and the probability of health insurance and income play essential roles as potential mechanisms to explain the causal impact of education on health care utilization in Vietnam.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 30%
Unspecified 3 30%
Other 1 10%
Researcher 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 20%
Social Sciences 2 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 10%
Other 0 0%