↓ Skip to main content

Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, November 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#41 of 1,611)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox
Published in
Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, November 2005
DOI 10.1007/s00244-004-0132-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Micevska, M. St. J. Warne, F. Pablo, R. Patra

Abstract

Cigarette butts are the most numerically frequent form of litter in the world. In Australia alone, 24-32 billion cigarette butts are littered annually. Despite this littering, few studies have been undertaken to explore the toxicity of cigarette butts in aquatic ecosystems. The acute toxicity of 19 filtered cigarette types to Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia (48-hr EC50 (immobilization)) and Vibrio fischeri (30-min EC50 (bioluminescence)) was determined using leachates from artificially smoked cigarette butts. There was a 2.9- and 8-fold difference in toxicity between the least and most toxic cigarette butts to C. cf. dubia and V. fischeri, respectively. Overall, C. cf. dubia was more inherently sensitive than V. fischeri by a factor of approximately 15.4, and the interspecies relationship between C. cf. dubia and V. fischeri was poor (R(2) = 0.07). This poor relationship indicates that toxicity data for cigarette butts for one species could not predict or model the toxicity of cigarette butts to the other species. However, the order of the toxicity of leachates can be predicted. It was determined that organic compounds caused the majority of toxicity in the cigarette butt leachates. Of the 14 organic compounds identified, nicotine and ethylphenol were suspected to be the main causative toxicants. There was a strong relationship between toxicity and tar content and between toxicity and nicotine content for two of the three brands of cigarettes (R(2 )> 0.70) for C. cf. dubia and one brand for V. fischeri. However, when the cigarettes were pooled, the relationship was weak (R(2) < 0.40) for both test species. Brand affected the toxicity to both species but more so for V. fischeri.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 29%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Researcher 8 12%
Professor 6 9%
Other 14 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Unspecified 8 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 17 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#1,136,596
of 13,434,786 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#41
of 1,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,577
of 279,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#1
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,434,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,611 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.