↓ Skip to main content

Text neck and neck pain in 18–21-year-old young adults

Overview of attention for article published in European Spine Journal, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 3,715)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
286 tweeters
facebook
43 Facebook pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
Title
Text neck and neck pain in 18–21-year-old young adults
Published in
European Spine Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00586-017-5444-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerson Moreira Damasceno, Arthur Sá Ferreira, Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira, Felipe José Jandre Reis, Igor Caio Santana Andrade, Ney Meziat-Filho

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between text neck and neck pain in young adults. Observational cross-sectional study with 150 18-21-year-old young adults from a public high school in the state of Rio de Janeiro was performed. In the self-report questionnaire, the participants answered questions on sociodemographic factors, anthropometric factors, time spent texting or playing on a mobile phone, visual impairments, and concern with the body posture. The neck posture was assessed by participants' self-perception and physiotherapists' judgment during a mobile phone texting message task. The Young Spine Questionnaire was used to evaluate the neck pain. Four multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to investigate the association between neck posture during mobile phone texting and neck pain, considering potential confounding factors. There is no association between neck posture, assessed by self-perception, and neck pain (OR = 1.66, p = 0.29), nor between neck posture, assessed by physiotherapists' judgment, and neck pain (OR = 1.23, p = 0.61). There was also no association between neck posture, assessed by self-perception, and frequency of neck pain (OR = 2.19, p = 0.09), nor between neck posture, assessed by physiotherapists' judgment, and frequency of neck pain (OR = 1.17, p = 0.68). This study did not show an association between text neck and neck pain in 18-21-year-old young adults. The findings challenge the belief that neck posture during mobile phone texting is associated to the growing prevalence of neck pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 286 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 190 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 43 23%
Student > Master 27 14%
Researcher 16 8%
Other 13 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 6%
Other 42 22%
Unknown 38 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 49 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 45 24%
Sports and Recreations 12 6%
Psychology 7 4%
Unspecified 5 3%
Other 30 16%
Unknown 42 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 223. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2020.
All research outputs
#74,456
of 15,363,529 outputs
Outputs from European Spine Journal
#5
of 3,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,488
of 405,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Spine Journal
#1
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,363,529 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,715 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 405,104 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.