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Bone Geometry, Quality, and Bone Markers in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Overview of attention for article published in Calcified Tissue International, December 2017
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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19 Mendeley
Title
Bone Geometry, Quality, and Bone Markers in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Published in
Calcified Tissue International, December 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00223-017-0381-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roberto Franceschi, Silvia Longhi, Vittoria Cauvin, Angelo Fassio, Giuseppe Gallo, Fiorenzo Lupi, Petra Reinstadler, Antonio Fanolla, Davide Gatti, Giorgio Radetti

Abstract

Adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus show a high risk of bone fracture, probably as a consequence of a decreased bone mass and microarchitectural bone alterations. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential negative effects of type 1 diabetes on bone geometry, quality, and bone markers in a group of children and adolescents. 96 children, mean age 10.5 ± 3.1 years, agreed to participate to the study. Bone geometry was evaluated on digitalized X-rays at the level of the 2nd metacarpal bone. The following parameters were investigated and expressed as SDS: outer diameter (D), inner diameter (d), cortical area (CA), and medullary area (MA). Bone strength was evaluated as Bending Breaking Resistance Index (BBRI) from the geometric data. Bone turnover markers (PINP, CTX-I, and BAP), sclerostin, Dkk-1, PTH, and 25OH-Vitamin D were also assessed. A group of healthy 40 subjects of normal body weight and height served as controls for the bone markers. D (- 0.99 ± 0.98), d (- 0.41 ± 0.88), CA (- 0.85 ± 0.78), and MA (- 0.46 ± 0.78) were all significantly smaller than in controls (p < 0.01). BBRI was significantly lower (- 2.61 ± 2.18; p < 0.0001). PTH, PINP, and BAP were higher in the diabetic children. Multiple regression analysis showed that CA and D were influenced by insulin/Kg/day and by BMI, while d was influenced by PINP only. Type 1 diabetic children show smaller and weaker bones. The increased bone turnover could play a key role since it might amplify the deficit in bone strength associated with the inadequate osteoblastic activity caused by the disease itself.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 37%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 16%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 47%
Unspecified 7 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Sports and Recreations 1 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,485,456
of 12,979,316 outputs
Outputs from Calcified Tissue International
#967
of 1,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,231
of 380,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Calcified Tissue International
#11
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,979,316 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,309 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 380,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.