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Carcinogenicity of deoxycholate, a secondary bile acid

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Toxicology, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
137 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
Title
Carcinogenicity of deoxycholate, a secondary bile acid
Published in
Archives of Toxicology, January 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00204-011-0648-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Achyut K. Bhattacharyya, Huy Nguyen, Claire M. Payne, Beryl Zaitlin, Harris Bernstein

Abstract

High dietary fat causes increased bile acid secretion into the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with colon cancer. Since the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DOC) is suggested to be important in colon cancer etiology, this study investigated whether DOC, at a high physiologic level, could be a colon carcinogen. Addition of 0.2% DOC for 8-10 months to the diet of 18 wild-type mice induced colonic tumors in 17 mice, including 10 with cancers. Addition of the antioxidant chlorogenic acid at 0.007% to the DOC-supplemented diet significantly reduced tumor formation. These results indicate that a high fat diet in humans, associated with increased risk of colon cancer, may have its carcinogenic potential mediated through the action of bile acids, and that some dietary anti-oxidants may ameliorate this carcinogenicity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 96 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 26%
Researcher 19 19%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Other 11 11%
Other 19 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 14%
Unspecified 12 12%
Chemistry 8 8%
Other 9 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,682,481
of 12,633,553 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Toxicology
#494
of 1,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,863
of 276,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Toxicology
#2
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,633,553 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,807 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.