↓ Skip to main content

Incidental branch retinal artery occlusion on optical coherence tomography angiography presenting as segmental optic atrophy in a child: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Ophthalmology, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Incidental branch retinal artery occlusion on optical coherence tomography angiography presenting as segmental optic atrophy in a child: a case report
Published in
BMC Ophthalmology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12886-017-0653-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ji Hyung Choi, Hee Kyung Yang, Ji Eun Lee

Abstract

Retinal artery occlusion is extremely rare in the pediatric population and most patients have risk factors. We report a case of a healthy child with segmental optic atrophy, complicated by incidental branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). A 10-year-old boy who had a history of his mother's gestational diabetes presented with an inferonasal visual field defect in the left eye. His best-corrected visual acuities were 20/20 in both eyes (OU). Fundoscopic examination revealed segmental pallor of the left optic disc, thinning of the superotemporal rim, a relative superior entrance of the central retinal artery and superior peripapillary scleral halo. Fluorescein angiography showed patchy filling delays in the corresponding disc area without retinal vascular abnormalities. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) via automated segmentation analysis demonstrated sectoral absence of the ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer with thinning of the inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer and outer plexiform layer in the corresponding retina. OCT angiography (OCTA) showed focal attenuation of superficial and intermediate/deep capillary plexuses in the corresponding areas. Systemic evaluation was unremarkable. The patient was diagnosed with segmental optic atrophy caused by incidental BRAO. Retinal vascular occlusions are rare in childhood, and may present as segmental optic atrophy mimicking congenital anomalies. OCTA allows the detection of previous microvascular abnormalities in the chronic phase. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a child with segmental optic atrophy presumably caused by BRAO, which was documented by SD OCT and OCTA in detail.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Student > Master 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Sports and Recreations 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,916,808
of 12,319,220 outputs
Outputs from BMC Ophthalmology
#456
of 660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#287,127
of 346,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Ophthalmology
#41
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,319,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 660 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.