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Khat – a controversial plant

Overview of attention for article published in Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine), October 2009
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
Title
Khat – a controversial plant
Published in
Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine), October 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00508-009-1259-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica E. Balint, George Falkay, Gabor A. Balint

Abstract

Khat (Catha edulis) is a shrub or tree whose leaves have been chewed for centuries by people who live in the Eastern part of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. It has recently turned up in North America and Europe, particularly among emigrants and refugees from countries such as Somalia, Ethiopia and Yemen. Khat contains a number of chemicals, among which are two controlled substances, cathinone (Schedule I) and cathine (Schedule IV). Both chemicals are stimulant drugs with effects similar to amphetamine. Chewing the leaves makes people feel more alert and talkative, and suppresses appetite. Chewing khat leaves releases cathinone, a stimulant that produces the feeling of euphoria. When cathinone is broken down in the body, it produces chemicals including cathine and norephedrine, which have a similar structure to amphetamine and adrenaline (epinephrine). Regular khat use is associated with a rise in arterial blood pressure and pulse rate, corresponding with levels of cathinone in the plasma. Moreover, regular khat chewers have gingivitis and loose teeth, but there appears to be no convincing unusual incidence of oral cancer. Among khat users in Yemen there is, however, a higher incidence of esophageal cancer compared with gastric cancer. Long term use or abuse can cause insomnia, anorexia, gastric disorders, depression, liver damage and cardiac complications, including myocardial infarction. Manic and delusional behavior, violence, suicidal depression, hallucinations, paranoia and khat-induced psychosis have also been reported. On the basis of the scientific data it seems clear that khat use has negative consequences on the economic development of a country and on the health of the society.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 150 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 23%
Student > Bachelor 23 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Unspecified 17 11%
Researcher 16 10%
Other 43 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 38%
Unspecified 26 17%
Psychology 13 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 8%
Social Sciences 10 6%
Other 35 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2017.
All research outputs
#3,181,158
of 12,538,991 outputs
Outputs from Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine)
#78
of 472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,998
of 284,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine)
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,991 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 472 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.