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Molecular insights into the non-recombining nature of the spinach male-determining region

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Genetics & Genomics, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
Title
Molecular insights into the non-recombining nature of the spinach male-determining region
Published in
Molecular Genetics & Genomics, December 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00438-017-1405-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomohiro Kudoh, Mitsuhiko Takahashi, Takayuki Osabe, Atsushi Toyoda, Hideki Hirakawa, Yutaka Suzuki, Nobuko Ohmido, Yasuyuki Onodera

Abstract

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is a dioecious plant with male heterogametic sex determination and homomorphic sex chromosomes (XY). The dioecism is utilized for producing commercial hybrid seeds, and hence understanding the molecular-genetic basis of the species' sex determining locus is an important issue for spinach breeding. In this study, seven dominant DNA markers were shown to completely co-segregate with the male-determining gene in segregating spinach populations comprising > 1500 plants. In addition, these seven dominant DNA markers were completely associated with the male-determining gene in over 100 spinach germplasm accessions and cultivars. These observations suggest that, in spinach, a Y-chromosomal region around the male-determining locus does not (or almost not) recombine with a counterpart region on the X chromosome. Using five of the seven DNA markers, five bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone contigs with a total length of approximately 690 kbp were constructed. Full sequencing of six representative BAC clones (total insert length 504 kbp) from the five contigs and a transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq revealed that the Y-chromosomal region around the male-determining locus contains large amounts of repetitive elements, suggesting that the region might be poor in gene content. Most of the repeats found in this region are novel Ty1-copia-like and its derivative elements that accumulate predominantly in heterochromatic regions. Our findings may provide valuable insight into spinach genome structure and clues for future research into the evolution of the sex determining locus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 35%
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Master 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 24%
Computer Science 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,498,362
of 12,276,356 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#558
of 1,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,069
of 344,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,276,356 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,044 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.