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The Protective Effects of Parental Monitoring and Internet Restriction on Adolescents’ Risk of Online Harassment

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Youth & Adolescence, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
152 Mendeley
Title
The Protective Effects of Parental Monitoring and Internet Restriction on Adolescents’ Risk of Online Harassment
Published in
Journal of Youth & Adolescence, December 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10964-014-0242-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Atika Khurana, Amy Bleakley, Amy B. Jordan, Daniel Romer

Abstract

With many adolescents using the internet to communicate with their peers, online harassment is on the rise among youth. The purpose of this study was to understand how parental monitoring and strategies parents use to regulate children's internet use (i.e., internet restriction) can help reduce online harassment among adolescents. Online survey data were collected from a nationally representative sample of parents and their 12-17 year old adolescents (n = 629; 49 % female). Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect effects of parental monitoring and internet restriction on being a victim of online harassment. Potential mediators included adolescents' frequency of use of social networking websites, time spent on computers outside of school, and internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. Age and gender differences were also explored. Adolescents' reports of parental monitoring and efforts to regulate specific forms of internet use were associated with reduced rates of online harassment. Specifically, the effect of parental monitoring was largely direct and 26 times greater than parental internet restriction. The latter was associated with lower rates of harassment only indirectly by limiting internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. These effects operated similarly for younger and older adolescents and for males and females. Adolescents' perceptions of parental monitoring and awareness can be protective against online harassment. Specific restriction strategies such as regulating internet time and content can also help reduce the risk of online harassment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 149 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 17%
Researcher 17 11%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 29 19%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 45 30%
Social Sciences 39 26%
Computer Science 12 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 32 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2019.
All research outputs
#380,656
of 13,472,087 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#64
of 1,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,832
of 261,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,472,087 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,203 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.