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Techniques for the collection, transportation, and isolation of orchid endophytes from afar: a case study from Madagascar

Overview of attention for article published in Botanical Studies, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 100)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
Title
Techniques for the collection, transportation, and isolation of orchid endophytes from afar: a case study from Madagascar
Published in
Botanical Studies, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40529-017-0209-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lawrence W. Zettler, Landy Rajaovelona, Kazutomo Yokoya, Jonathan P. Kendon, Andrew L. Stice, Amanda E. Wood, Viswambharan Sarasan

Abstract

Tropical orchids need more study with respect to their mycorrhizal associations. For researchers in distant countries who aspire to study these orchids augmenting their conservation, the great distances involved, coupled with limited funds, pose formidable challenges. These challenges are sometimes exacerbated by political unrest, delays in securing permits, unexpected hardships, and the risk that the biological samples collected (e.g., roots harboring mycorrhizal fungi) will not survive long-distance transport. We describe a protocol for the collection and transport of root samples from Madagascar orchids to labs in the United Kingdom (Kew) and the United States (Illinois) where Rhizoctonia-like fungi were subsequently isolated. Three separate trips were made spanning 4 years (2012-2015), with emphasis on the collection of roots from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchids inhabiting the Itremo Massif of the Central Highlands. Collectively, the trips to Madagascar resulted in the isolation of all major groups of Rhizoctonia-like fungi (Ceratobasidium, Tulasnella, Sebacina) from all three orchid growth forms (terrestrials, epiphytes and lithophytes). Sampling of terrestrial and epiphytes during the rainy season (January) yielded best results. Our study demonstrates that peloton-forming fungi in root samples can retain viability up to 3 weeks after collection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Researcher 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 19%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,773,530
of 12,231,187 outputs
Outputs from Botanical Studies
#50
of 100 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#243,016
of 339,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Botanical Studies
#8
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,231,187 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 100 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.