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Global phylogenetic analysis of contemporary aleutian mink disease viruses (AMDVs)

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, November 2017
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Title
Global phylogenetic analysis of contemporary aleutian mink disease viruses (AMDVs)
Published in
Virology Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0898-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Ryt-Hansen, E. E. Hagberg, M. Chriél, T. Struve, A. G. Pedersen, L. E. Larsen, C. K. Hjulsager

Abstract

Aleutian mink disease has major economic consequences on the mink farming industry worldwide, as it causes a disease that affects both the fur quality and the health and welfare of the mink. The virus causing this disease is a single-stranded DNA virus of the genus Amdoparvovirus belonging to the family of Parvoviridae. In Denmark, infection with AMDV has largely been restricted to a region in the northern part of the country since 2001, affecting only 5% of the total Danish mink farms. However, in 2015 outbreaks of AMDV were diagnosed in all parts of the country. Initial analyses revealed that the out breaks were caused by two different strains of AMDV that were significant different from the circulating Danish strains. To track the source of these outbreaks, a major investigation of global AMDV strains was initiated. Samples from 13 different countries were collected and partial NS1 gene was sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The analyses revealed that AMDV exhibited substantial genetic diversity. No clear country wise clustering was evident, but exchange of viruses between countries was revealed. One of the Danish outbreaks was caused by a strain of AMDV that closely resembled a strain originating from Sweden. In contrast, we did not identify any potential source for the other and more widespread outbreak strain. To the authors knowledge this is the first major global phylogenetic study of contemporary AMDV partial NS1 sequences. The study proved that partial NS1 sequencing can be used to distinguish virus strains belonging to major clusters. The partial NS1 sequencing can therefore be a helpful tool in combination with epidemiological data, in relation to outbreak tracking. However detailed information on farm to farm transmission requires full genome sequencing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Unspecified 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 29%
Unspecified 4 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,287,243
of 13,483,547 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,564
of 2,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#258,025
of 389,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#137
of 215 outputs
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