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Cancer incidence in Stockholm firefighters 1958–2012: an updated cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in International Archives of Occupational & Environmental Health, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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10 Mendeley
Title
Cancer incidence in Stockholm firefighters 1958–2012: an updated cohort study
Published in
International Archives of Occupational & Environmental Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00420-017-1276-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecilia Kullberg, Tomas Andersson, Per Gustavsson, Jenny Selander, Göran Tornling, Annika Gustavsson, Carolina Bigert

Abstract

Previous studies on firefighters indicate an increased risk of cancer although findings regarding which cancer sites are in excess have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the cancer incidence among Swedish firefighters. This updated cohort study included 1080 men who worked at least 1 year as a firefighter in the city of Stockholm, Sweden during 1931-1983. First-time diagnoses of cancer were identified through the Swedish Cancer Registry from 1958 until 2012. Employment as a firefighter was determined from the annual fire station enrolment records. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated using the Stockholm population as reference. Firefighters in Stockholm had a low overall risk of cancer (SIR = 0.81 95% CI 0.71-0.91). However, firefighters were at an increased risk of stomach cancer (SIR = 1.89 95% CI 1.25-2.75). Firefighters had significantly low risks for prostate cancer (SIR = 0.68 95% CI 0.52-0.87) and malignant melanoma of the skin (SIR = 0.30 95% CI 0.06-0.88). There was a statistically significant trend of increasing overall risk of cancer with increasing employment duration, although there was still no excess of cancer overall in any of the categories of employment duration. Stockholm firefighters had an increased risk of stomach cancer but a low overall risk of cancer. The trend of increasing overall risk of cancer with increasing employment duration could potentially be related to the carcinogenic exposures at work.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 30%
Unspecified 2 20%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Social Sciences 1 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 10%
Other 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,176,282
of 12,645,670 outputs
Outputs from International Archives of Occupational & Environmental Health
#377
of 1,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,000
of 386,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Archives of Occupational & Environmental Health
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,645,670 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,445 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 386,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.