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Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: effects of scale and climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Aquatic Sciences, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 386)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
Title
Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: effects of scale and climate change
Published in
Aquatic Sciences, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00027-017-0557-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. H. Fullerton, C. E. Torgersen, J. J. Lawler, E. A. Steel, J. L. Ebersole, S. Y. Lee

Abstract

Climate-change driven increases in water temperature pose challenges for aquatic organisms. Predictions of impacts typically do not account for fine-grained spatiotemporal thermal patterns in rivers. Patches of cooler water could serve as refuges for anadromous species like salmon that migrate during summer. We used high-resolution remotely sensed water temperature data to characterize summer thermal heterogeneity patterns for 11,308 km of 2nd- to 7th-order rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California (USA). We evaluated (1) water temperature patterns at different spatial resolutions, (2) the frequency, size, and spacing of cool thermal patches suitable for Pacific salmon (i.e., contiguous stretches ≥0.25 km, ≤15°C and ≥2°C cooler than adjacent water), and (3) potential influences of climate change on availability of cool patches. Thermal heterogeneity was nonlinearly related to the spatial resolution of water temperature data, and heterogeneity at fine resolution (<1 km) would have been difficult to quantify without spatially continuous data. Cool patches were generally >2.7 and <13.0 km long, and spacing among patches was generally >5.7 and <49.4 km. Thermal heterogeneity varied among rivers, some of which had long uninterrupted stretches of warm water ≥20°C, and others had many smaller cool patches. Our models predicted little change in future thermal heterogeneity among rivers, but within-river patterns sometimes changed markedly compared to contemporary patterns. These results can inform long-term monitoring programs as well as near-term climate-adaptation strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 10 17%
Other 8 14%
Unspecified 7 12%
Other 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 28%
Unspecified 9 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 9%
Engineering 3 5%
Other 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,032,151
of 13,353,516 outputs
Outputs from Aquatic Sciences
#18
of 386 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,333
of 388,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aquatic Sciences
#2
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,353,516 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 386 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.