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Presence of thallium in the environment: sources of contaminations, distribution and monitoring methods

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
Title
Presence of thallium in the environment: sources of contaminations, distribution and monitoring methods
Published in
Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10661-016-5647-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bozena Karbowska

Abstract

Thallium is released into the biosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources. It is generally present in the environment at low levels; however, human activity has greatly increased its content. Atmospheric emission and deposition from industrial sources have resulted in increased concentrations of thallium in the vicinity of mineral smelters and coal-burning facilities. Increased levels of thallium are found in vegetables, fruit and farm animals. Thallium is toxic even at very low concentrations and tends to accumulate in the environment once it enters the food chain. Thallium and thallium-based compounds exhibit higher water solubility compared to other heavy metals. They are therefore also more mobile (e.g. in soil), generally more bioavailable and tend to bioaccumulate in living organisms. The main aim of this review was to summarize the recent data regarding the actual level of thallium content in environmental niches and to elucidate the most significant sources of thallium in the environment. The review also includes an overview of analytical methods, which are commonly applied for determination of thallium in fly ash originating from industrial combustion of coal, in surface and underground waters, in soils and sediments (including soil derived from different parent materials), in plant and animal tissues as well as in human organisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 1%
Unknown 69 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 24%
Student > Master 10 14%
Other 7 10%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 12 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 24%
Chemistry 12 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2019.
All research outputs
#2,523,455
of 14,189,350 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#112
of 1,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,227
of 400,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#5
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,189,350 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,485 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 400,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.