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Trends in bednet ownership and usage, and the effect of bednets on malaria hospitalization in the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS): 2008–2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
Title
Trends in bednet ownership and usage, and the effect of bednets on malaria hospitalization in the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS): 2008–2015
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2822-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Kamau, Victoria Nyaga, Evasius Bauni, Benjamin Tsofa, Abdisalan M. Noor, Philip Bejon, J. Anthony G. Scott, Laura L. Hammitt

Abstract

Use of bednets reduces malaria morbidity and mortality. In Kilifi, Kenya, there was a mass distribution of free nets to children < 5 years in 2006. In 2009, a new policy was implemented to offer bednets to pregnant women and children < 5 years free of charge. Nets were again distributed to children and adults through national mass campaigns in 2012 and 2015. We aimed to evaluate trends in bednet ownership and usage, and the effect of bednets on the incidence of malaria hospitalization in children < 5 years within the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS). Bednet ownership and usage were assessed during eight routine enumeration rounds of the KHDSS between 2008 and 2015. Malaria admissions (i.e. admissions to hospital with P. falciparum > 2500 parasitemia per μl) among children < 5 years were captured using a system of continuous vital registration that links admissions at Kilifi County Hospital to the KHDSS population register. Survival analysis was used to assess relative risk of hospitalization with malaria among children that reported using a bednet compared to those who did not. We observed 63% and 62% mean bednet ownership and usage, respectively, over the eight-survey period. Among children < 5 years, reported bednet ownership in October-December 2008 was 69% and in March-August 2009 was 73% (p < 0.001). An increase was also observed following the mass distribution campaigns in 2012 (62% in May-July 2012 vs 90% in May-October 2013, p < 0.001) and 2015 (68% in June-September 2015 vs 93% in October-November 2015, p < 0.001). Among children <5 years who reported using a net the night prior to the survey, the incidence of malaria hospitalization per 1000 child-years was 2.91 compared to 4.37 among those who did not (HR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.85 [p = 0.001]). On longitudinal surveillance, increasing bednet ownership and usage corresponded to mass distribution campaigns; however, this method of delivering bednets did not result in sustained improvements in coverage. Among children < 5 years old bednet use was associated with a 33% decreased incidence of malaria hospitalization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 30%
Computer Science 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,780,065
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#812
of 4,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,047
of 266,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#135
of 668 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,681 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,126 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 668 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.