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The Role of the Residential Neighborhood in Linking Youths’ Family Poverty Trajectory to Decreased Feelings of Safety at School

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Youth & Adolescence, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
The Role of the Residential Neighborhood in Linking Youths’ Family Poverty Trajectory to Decreased Feelings of Safety at School
Published in
Journal of Youth & Adolescence, November 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10964-014-0214-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolyn Côté-Lussier, Tracie A. Barnett, Yan Kestens, Mai Thanh Tu, Louise Séguin

Abstract

Although disadvantaged youth are more likely to be victimized at school, victimization only partly explains their decreased feelings of safety at school. We applied a socioecological approach to test the hypotheses that the experience of poverty is associated with decreased feelings of safety at school, and that residential neighborhood features partly mediate the relationship between poverty and feeling less safe at school. This study draws on the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD) which began in 1998 with a representative population-based cohort of 2,120 5-month old infants (49.1 % female) and their primary caregiver. The study also includes measures of ego-centred residential neighborhood exposures (based on a 500 m circular buffer zone surrounding the family's residential postal code) derived from a spatial data infrastructure. We used latent growth modeling to estimate youth's family poverty trajectory from age 5 months to 13 years, and structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results suggest that youth experiencing chronic and later-childhood poverty felt less safe at school in part because they lived in neighborhoods that their parents described as being disorderly (e.g., demarked by the presence of garbage, drug use and groups of trouble-makers). These neighborhoods also tended to have less greenery (e.g., trees, parks) and more lone-parent households. Neighborhood features did not help explain the relationship between early-childhood poverty and feeling less safe at school. The findings suggest that targeting residential neighborhood features such as greenery and disorder could improve youth's felt safety at school, particularly for those experiencing chronic and later-childhood poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 9 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Psychology 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 12 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#428,894
of 12,317,848 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#66
of 1,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,982
of 226,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#4
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,317,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,082 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.