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Low-level laser therapy improves the VO2 kinetics in competitive cyclists

Overview of attention for article published in Lasers in Medical Science, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 854)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

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10 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
Title
Low-level laser therapy improves the VO2 kinetics in competitive cyclists
Published in
Lasers in Medical Science, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10103-017-2347-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fábio J. Lanferdini, Renata L. Krüger, Bruno M. Baroni, Caetano Lazzari, Pedro Figueiredo, Alvaro Reischak-Oliveira, Marco A. Vaz

Abstract

Some evidence supports that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces neuromuscular fatigue, so incrementing sports performance. A previous randomized controlled trial of our group showed increased exercise tolerance in male competitive cyclists treated with three different LLLT doses (3, 6, and 9 J/diode; or 135, 270, and 405 J/thigh) before time-to-exhaustion cycling tests. Now, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of these LLLT doses on the VO2 kinetics of athletes during cycling tests. Twenty male competitive cyclists (29 years) participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. On the first day, the participants performed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2MAX) and maximal power output (POMAX), as well as a familiarization with the time-to-exhaustion test. In the following days (2 to 5), all participants performed time-to-exhaustion tests at POMAX. Before the exhaustion test, different doses of LLLT (3, 6, and 9 J/diode; or 135, 270, and 405 J/thigh, respectively) or placebo were applied bilaterally to the quadriceps muscle. All exhaustion tests were monitored online by an open-circuit spirometry system in order to analyze the VO2 amplitude, VO2 delay time, time constant (tau), and O2 deficit. Tau and O2 deficit were decreased with LLLT applications compared to the placebo condition (p < 0.05). No differences (p > 0.05) were found between the experimental conditions for VO2 amplitude and VO2 delay time. In conclusion, LLLT decreases tau and O2 deficit during time-to-exhaustion tests in competitive cyclists, and these changes in VO2 kinetics response can be one of the possible mechanisms to explain the ergogenic effect induced by LLLT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Professor 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 10 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 25%
Sports and Recreations 9 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,758,754
of 12,181,658 outputs
Outputs from Lasers in Medical Science
#40
of 854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,979
of 281,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lasers in Medical Science
#2
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,181,658 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 854 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.