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Bioconversion of distillers’ grains hydrolysates to advanced biofuels by an Escherichia coli co-culture

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Cell Factories, November 2017
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22 Mendeley
Title
Bioconversion of distillers’ grains hydrolysates to advanced biofuels by an Escherichia coli co-culture
Published in
Microbial Cell Factories, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12934-017-0804-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fang Liu, Weihua Wu, Mary B. Tran-Gyamfi, James D. Jaryenneh, Xun Zhuang, Ryan W. Davis

Abstract

First generation bioethanol production utilizes the starch fraction of maize, which accounts for approximately 60% of the ash-free dry weight of the grain. Scale-up of this technology for fuels applications has resulted in a massive supply of distillers' grains with solubles (DGS) coproduct, which is rich in cellulosic polysaccharides and protein. It was surmised that DGS would be rapidly adopted for animal feed applications, however, this has not been observed based on inconsistency of the product stream and other logistics-related risks, especially toxigenic contaminants. Therefore, efficient valorization of DGS for production of petroleum displacing products will significantly improve the techno-economic feasibility and net energy return of the established starch bioethanol process. In this study, we demonstrate 'one-pot' bioconversion of the protein and carbohydrate fractions of a DGS hydrolysate into C4 and C5 fusel alcohols through development of a microbial consortium incorporating two engineered Escherichia coli biocatalyst strains. The carbohydrate conversion strain E. coli BLF2 was constructed from the wild type E. coli strain B and showed improved capability to produce fusel alcohols from hexose and pentose sugars. Up to 12 g/L fusel alcohols was produced from glucose or xylose synthetic medium by E. coli BLF2. The second strain, E. coli AY3, was dedicated for utilization of proteins in the hydrolysates to produce mixed C4 and C5 alcohols. To maximize conversion yield by the co-culture, the inoculation ratio between the two strains was optimized. The co-culture with an inoculation ratio of 1:1.5 of E. coli BLF2 and AY3 achieved the highest total fusel alcohol titer of up to 10.3 g/L from DGS hydrolysates. The engineered E. coli co-culture system was shown to be similarly applicable for biofuel production from other biomass sources, including algae hydrolysates. Furthermore, the co-culture population dynamics revealed by quantitative PCR analysis indicated that despite the growth rate difference between the two strains, co-culturing didn't compromise the growth of each strain. The q-PCR analysis also demonstrated that fermentation with an appropriate initial inoculation ratio of the two strains was important to achieve a balanced co-culture population which resulted in higher total fuel titer. The efficient conversion of DGS hydrolysates into fusel alcohols will significantly improve the feasibility of the first generation bioethanol process. The integrated carbohydrate and protein conversion platform developed here is applicable for the bioconversion of a variety of biomass feedstocks rich in sugars and proteins.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Master 5 23%
Other 3 14%
Unspecified 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 23%
Engineering 4 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Other 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,760,891
of 13,801,769 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Cell Factories
#469
of 1,001 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,401
of 315,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Cell Factories
#33
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,801,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,001 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.