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Gesture imitation in musicians and non-musicians

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, June 2010
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Title
Gesture imitation in musicians and non-musicians
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, June 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00221-010-2322-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Spilka, Christopher J. Steele, Virginia B. Penhune

Abstract

Imitation plays a crucial role in the learning of many complex motor skills. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence suggests that the ability to imitate is influenced by past experience, such as musical training. To investigate the impact of musical training on motor imitation, musicians and non-musicians were tested on their ability to imitate videoclips of simple and complex two-handed gestures taken from American Sign Language. Participants viewed a set of 30 gestures, one at a time, and imitated them immediately after presentation. Participants' imitations were videotaped and scored off-line by raters blind to participant group. Imitation performance was assessed by a rating of performance accuracy, where the arm, hand, and finger components of the gestures were rated separately on a 5-point scale (1 = unrecognizable; 5 = exact imitation). A global accuracy score (PAglobal) was calculated by summing the three components. Response duration compared to the model (%MTdiff), and reaction time (RT) were also assessed. Results indicated that musicians were able to imitate more accurately than non-musicians, reflected by significantly higher PAglobal and lower %MTdiff scores. Furthermore, the greatest difference in performance was for the fine-motor (finger) gesture component. These findings support the view that the ability to imitate is influenced by experience. This is consistent with generalist theories of motor imitation, which explain imitation in terms of links between perceptual and motor action representations that become strengthened through experience. It is also likely that musical training contributed to the ability to imitate manual gestures by influencing the personal action repertoire of musicians.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Italy 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Japan 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 54 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 34%
Researcher 13 21%
Student > Master 7 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 11%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 42%
Neuroscience 8 13%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Engineering 4 6%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 15 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2014.
All research outputs
#9,765,985
of 12,219,322 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,620
of 2,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,839
of 229,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#32
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,140 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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