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Postpartum outcomes of a pilot prenatal care-based psychosocial intervention for PTSD during pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Women's Mental Health, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Postpartum outcomes of a pilot prenatal care-based psychosocial intervention for PTSD during pregnancy
Published in
Archives of Women's Mental Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00737-017-0794-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linda Weinreb, Melodie Wenz-Gross, Carole Upshur

Abstract

This study examines postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and secondary outcomes including postpartum depression and birth outcomes for pregnant women who screened positive for PTSD and received a psychosocial education intervention compared to women with PTSD in the usual prenatal care setting. All women entering prenatal care at two federally qualified health centers were screened for symptoms of current PTSD; one site was selected randomly to have prenatal care advocates deliver eight Seeking Safety topics for women with clinical or subclinical PTSD. Women were not blind to condition. Baseline and postpartum interviews, including demographic characteristics and assessment of mental health, social support, and coping skills, were conducted. Medical record data was collected to document preterm delivery and low birth weight. Of the 149 participants at baseline, 128 (86%) participated in the postpartum interview. Intervention women, compared to controls, significantly decreased PTSD symptoms, and showed a non-significant trend for improved social support. However, depression, coping, and birth outcomes did not differ. This study suggests some initial support for the Seeking Safety intervention in prenatal care settings and requires further research to determine the best approaches to its implementation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 12 24%
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 18 35%
Psychology 13 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 12%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,639,203
of 12,196,902 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Women's Mental Health
#135
of 536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,777
of 285,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Women's Mental Health
#10
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 536 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,843 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.